pink cover page of Annual Meeting Kit 2014

Annual Meeting June 21 – Get Your News

The annual meeting of 2014 was attended by about 40 members. Mary Hughes our lunch speaker spoke about the desirability of getting more women into elected office.  According to Mary only 20% of legislative positions are held by women. Participation seems to be stuck at the level. Shouldn’t it be more like 50%? Mary believes such a body politic would be more collaborative, more productive, more civil and less polarized than the one we have now.

We’ve written more about the meeting in these posts:

Mary Hughes Talk on the importance of electing women to government offices

President Cathy Lazarus’s remarks about the themes at the LWV national convention in Dallas

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EXPIRED: This event has occurred…

This page contains

1) the form for online RSVP Yes, lunch entree selection and online payment via Paypal or credit card. Taking online orders through and including June 19.
2) instructions for offline RSVP Yes and payment by check. Payment by mailed check is now closed.
3) a link for downloading the 20 page annual meeting kit document
3) instructions for sending an email to RSVP Yes for the meeting only without lunch

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YES, I’LL ATTEND THE MEETING AND LUNCH WITH MARY HUGHES AND PAY ONLINE.

The form has been removed because the event has occurred.

You can get your meeting kit inside this article. In order to reduce costs and be greener, we will *If you have any problems with this online form please email [email protected].

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Yes, I’ll Attend the Meeting and Lunch with Mary Hughes and pay by check.  CLOSED AS OF JUNE 13

If you don’t want to pay online, please print out this last page of the meeting kit, fill out the paper form at the bottom of that page, and then mail it with a check payment per the instructions. If you do not have a home printer, you can simply write a note with the information requested in the form above  and mail your check.

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CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR MEETING KIT.

pink cover page of Annual Meeting Kit 2014In order to reduce costs and be greener, we will NOT be mailing the printed Annual Meeting Kits to all members. Instead please download it. We are sending members email asking members to download the Annual Meeting Kit from our website by clicking on this convenient weblink or the pink image. We anticipate members will read the kit at home and optionally print it on their home or office printer.  (If you sign-up to attend the meeting, you may request that we provide you with a printed kit at the meeting.)  About a dozen members without email will receive the kits by U.S. mail.

 

PLEASE REMEMBER TO BRING THE MEETING KIT WITH YOU ON JUNE 21!

 

ATTEND ONLY THE MEETING

If you want to attend ONLY the business meeting and aren’t staying for the lunch and the speaker, please email [email protected]. And tell us if you can’t print the meeting kit yourself and need a meeting kit provided at the meeting

 

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Mary Hughes seated with her laptop computer
Our speaker this year is Mary Hughes of close the gap CA. Mary aims to help progressive women run for elected office in California.

Saturday June 21 is Our Annual Meeting.

Our Schedule:

10:00  am Registration
10:20 am Meeting Called to Order
11:45 am Break and Conversation
NOON LUNCH
12:45 pm SPEAKER: Mary Hughes, close the Gap CA
TOPIC: Helping more progressive women run for elected office
1:30 pm Adjourn

Location:

Michaels at Shoreline
2960 Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View, CA (in Shoreline Park)

Menu: An entree salad with iced tea.  Choices are chopped cobb salad, pasta primavera salad, chinese chicken salad

Mary Hughes – Recruiting Women to run for elected office

We have an exceptionally interesting and timely speaker this year – Mary Hughes. Mary’s organization, close the gap CA, was formed “to increase the number of progressive women in the California legislature by recruiting talented, community-based, policy-focused women to run for open seats in 2014 and 2016.”

Mary V. Hughes is the President of Hughes & Company a political strategy and communications firm.  She is the architect of close the gap CA, a four-year (2013 – 2016) campaign to recruit talented, progressive women to run for the California legislature and of The 2012 Project, a national, non-partisan campaign to increase the number of women in Congress and state legislatures.

Hughes has advised candidates for President, Congress, state and legislative office.  Her work has contributed to several historic “firsts” for women: the first woman to lead her Party in Congress, the first woman Superintendent of California schools and the first out-lesbian judge elected in the nation.  Her writing on American politics has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle and The Huffington Post.    In 2013, Hughes was named “woman of the year” by California Women Lead and in 2012 Women’s e-News named her one of “21 leaders for the 21st Century.”

Hughes is a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law and Mt. Holyoke College and lives with her husband in Palo Alto, California.

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Mary Hughes seated with her laptop computer

Mary Hughes close the gap – June 21 Annual Meeting

March Hughes seated with her laptop computerOur League is thrilled that Mary Hughes close the gap CA —  a renown speaker and advocate for recruiting more women to elected office — is the keynote speaker at our Annual Business Meeting on June 21.  The meeting and luncheon from 10am to 1:30 will be held at Michaels at Shoreline as usual.

New this Year – Annual Meeting Kit will be Online

In order to reduce costs and be greener, we will be asking members to download the Annual Meeting Kit from our website. In late May — when the Annual Meeting Kit is completed — the League will email members with a convenient  weblink.  Those members without email or computers, will continue to receive a kit by mail.

Mary’s Bio

Mary V. Hughes is the President of Hughes & Company a political strategy and communications firm.  She is the architect of close the gap CA, a four-year (2013 – 2016) campaign to recruit talented, progressive women to run for the California legislature and of The 2012 Project, a national, non-partisan campaign to increase the number of women in Congress and state legislatures.

Hughes has advised candidates for President, Congress, state and legislative office.  Her work has contributed to several historic “firsts” for women: the first woman to lead her Party in Congress, the first woman Superintendent of California schools and the first out-lesbian judge elected in the nation.  Her writing on American politics has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle and The Huffington Post.    In 2013, Hughes was named “woman of the year” by California Women Lead and in 2012 Women’s e-News named her one of “21 leaders for the 21st Century.”

Hughes is a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law and Mt. Holyoke College and lives with her husband in Palo Alto, California.

 

Headshot Anna Eschoo with flags of US and California in background

Anna Eshoo – When Women Succeed, America Succeeds

 

Congressman Anna Eshoo explained why continuing to fight for women’s economic equality is so important. Eshoo came to San Jose City College on February 21 to speak to students about the work she is doing to promote the Women’s Economic Agenda supported by American Association of University Women (AAUW). Our local League or Women Voters publicized this event as of interest to our members. The Eshoo event was headlined “When Women Succeed, America Succeeds: An Economic Agenda for Women and Families.” Keynote speakers were Eshoo along with Esther Peralez-Dickman, Director of the County of Santa Clara Office of Women’s Policy and Suzanne Doty, who serves on Santa Clara County’s Commission on the Status of Women.

Economic Disparities cost women and their families

First Congresswoman Eshoo spoke about the reasons why continuing to fight for women’s economic equality is important. Although gains have been made, Eshoo reminded the audience that women still earn only 77 cents for every dollar a man earns, and the gap is even larger for women of color: African-American women earn 64 cents and Latina women only 55 cents for every dollar earned by men. Two-thirds of low-wage workers are women and in 40% of households with children the mother is the sole breadwinner. Clearly these disparities are costing America’s women, children and families. They are also costing the American economy between $400,000 and $2 million per year.

Graphic says women loose over $400,000 over a lifetime

 

It is one thing to look at numbers, no matter how staggering they may be. It is another to hear how the numbers affect real-life women and families. So Eshoo invited Peralez-Dickman and Doty to share their personal stories of how lack of economic equality affected them and their families.

Personal Stories

Peralez-Dickman bravely shared her family’s painful struggle with domestic violence. She was born in rural Texas to a family of immigrant parents and several siblings. Her father owned a construction company that depended on government contracts to stay in business. However, with government contracts come onerous government documentation requirements, which her father was unable to keep up with. Eventually the business went bankrupt. After losing his business Peralez-Dickman’s father, who had always had a drinking problem, became a hard-core alcoholic and began to beat his wife. He later abandoned his family, leaving Peralez-Dickman’s mother to raise her children alone.

http://feministactivism.com/2011/03/21/day-21-violence-against-women-in-the-us/

Suzanne Doty has also faced numerous struggles in her life. Doty was a business owner for 25 years and during that time experienced numerous personal and family health problems, including a high-risk pregnancy, a child with asthma, a mother with dementia and being diagnosed with breast cancer not just once but twice. The business she managed with her now ex-husband rented four retail stores and when the business ran into financial difficulty, three of the four landlords refused to negotiate for reduced rent payments. This forced the business into bankruptcy and the landlords to forgo all of the unpaid rent they would have otherwise received. Doty, at age 63, is now unemployed and unable to find another job. She has submitted more than 400 job applications and been invited to three interviews, with zero offers. She believes the cost of her health benefits, which cost approximately $900 per month, is scaring potential employers away from hiring her despite her MBA and years of experience. She is surviving on Social Security, which doesn’t pay enough to live in high-cost Silicon Valley. She also receives a $722 per month health care subsidy thanks to the Affordable Care Act, which has enabled her to purchase health insurance.

Audience Solution Ideas

The stories of Peralez-Dickman and Doty show that the issue of women’s economic equality touches on many other issues, such as domestic violence, health care, unemployment and the need for support for women entrepreneurs and small business owners. Audience members raised additional concerns. One Iranian-American woman expressed concern about helping immigrant women, especially those from highly oppressive countries, who are often unaware of what rights they have and how to exercise them. De Anza College statistics professor Andrew Phelps asked about how to make reasonableness play a larger role in public policy. In response to another audience member’s question, Suzanne Doty suggested that large corporations hire people to work at local nonprofits. If they did, Doty said, people could get jobs, nonprofits could get help, and corporations could get a tax write-off, making it a win-win-win. Congresswoman Eshoo agreed this is a good idea and promised to present it to the Silicon Valley Leadership Group.

The event concluded with some inspiring words from Eshoo. When President Obama, in his State of the Union address, declared that “When women succeed, America succeeds,” it was the highest-rated phrase in all of Obama’s speech.

The economic agenda for women and families

So what can be done to help women succeed? The AAUW and the LWV often have similar goals and collaborate, including here locally in the Mountain View – Los Altos area. The AAUW’s economic agenda for women and families will enable women to achieve greater economic security, raise wages for women and their families, and allow working parents to support and care for their families. It covers the areas of pay, work and family balance, and child care.

http://womensucceed.tumblr.com

 

Pay:

  • Paycheck fairness
  • Increase minimum wage (including tipped)
  • Invest in job training and education opportunities
  • Protect and restore employment rights
  • Support women entrepreneurs/small businesses
  • Pregnant workers fairness
  • Adequate tools to investigate wage discrimination

Work and Family Balance:

  • Paid sick leave
  • Paid family and medical leave
  • Expanded family and medical leave
  • Federal employees paid parental leave

Child Care:

  • President Obama’s preschool and Early Head Start/Child Care Initiative
  • Promote affordable and high-quality child care
  • Adequate funding of child care programs
  • Adequate training and pay for child care workers
  • Expand child care tax credit
  • Make child tax credit permanent and indexed
  • Increase access to child support

children on playground

 

To achieve paycheck fairness the AAUW supports passage of the Paycheck Fairness Act. To expand educational opportunities the AAUW supports expanded access to child care for women attending community colleges.  AAUW has no specific legislative position on increased access to child support but some ideas that might help are improving the functioning of the child support enforcement system our state already has (possibly by implementing a volunteer program for California’s Department of Child Support Services, modeled after a similar program in the state of Texas) as well as helping parents obtain higher-paying jobs so they can afford to pay child support.

Collaboration between AAUW and LWV?

Perhaps some League of Women Voters members would be interested in jointly working with the AAUW and starting a dialogue on how to help women more effectively access child support, childcare and educational opportunities in our county and state as well as how to achieve the other social welfare and juvenile justice goals of both organizations.

 

by Jenny Brooks