Mountain View City Council Meeting January 2018

Election of Mayor and Vice Mayor

In the ceremonial first meeting of the year, the Council elected Lenny Siegel and Lisa Matichak as the new Mayor and Vice Mayor. Outgoing Mayor Ken Rosenberg spoke about his proudest moments, including Mountain View’s self-designation as a Human Rights City and the adoption of the North Bayshore Precise Plan revision, which allows for up to 9,850 new housing units to be built in the office park north of Highway 101. In his remarks, Mayor Siegel emphasized the remaining work to be done on the East Whisman Precise Plan and the new Terra Bella “visioning” to determine the land uses in what are predominantly commercial areas. The Mayor also spoke about the City’s work in resisting the initiatives of the federal government.

Summary of Council Actions

The Council took action on a number of items in January. Previous reports have described the new regulatory framework the City is creating for commercial cannabis activity; consistent with that work, the Council extended the temporary moratorium necessary to prevent a “regulatory gap” (the absence of municipal regulations while an ordinance is being created). The Council also provided additional direction related to an agreement with the Los Altos School District to secure a site in Mountain View north of El Camino Real for a 10th school (described in a separate report).

Additionally, the Council adopted a work plan and established a subcommittee to work on 3 potential revenue measures that would appear on the November 2018 ballot: a tax on cannabis activity; an increase in the transient occupancy tax (TOT); and an update of the Business License Fee. The Council also approved an agreement with a consultant to assist the City with issues related to noise from South Flow Arrivals at the San Jose International Airport, sharing costs with the City of Los Altos.

Finally, the City approved an expansion of an affordable housing project at 460 North Shoreline Boulevard (Shorebreeze Apartments). The expansion replaces 12 existing affordable units with 62 new units. The residents of the 12 units would be temporarily relocated and ultimately moved back into the new units.

— Lucas Ramirez, Observer